Why choose Pilbrow Surveying Limited?Text Box: The X8 System

Supplying construction surveying services to the Auckland and Waikato regions since 1996

54 Scott Rd, RD2,

Te Kauwhata, 3782

Phone: 07 8264337

Fax: 07 8264337

E-mail: PilbrowSurveying@xtra.co.nz

Text Box: Why Choose Pilbrow Surveying Limited?
Text Box: What we do
Text Box: What we have done 
Text Box: What others think
Text Box:  Who we are
Text Box: What gear do we use 
How many stakes has Pilbrow Surveying Limited banged in so far this year?

Stakes banged in this year =  1893

Pilbrow Surveying Limited construction earthworks surveyors logoPilbrow Surveying Limited, the first company in New Zealand to be using the Gatewing X100 aerial mapping systemLink to page outlining the Gatewing X100 aerial mapping system in use by Pilbrow Surveying Limited, the first company in New Zealand to be using the system.

0800 PSL NOW                PilbrowSurveying@xtra.co.nzWhy choose Pilbrow Surveying Limited?Text Box: FAQ’s
The X8 was chosen from the many available UAV systems for a number of reasons.  It is manufactured by a New Zealand company, Altus. We did not want to have to deal with an overseas company for back up, maintenance and parts supply. The X8 has what is termed triple redundancy - it has twin GPS antennae, twin autopilots, four pairs of rotors and an ultimate fail safe in the form of a parachute system which deploys automatically if the unit tips over more than 70°. The system dismantles into two main sections - the power unit which comprises the rotors, electronic speed controllers, rotor arms, GPS antennae and autopilots and the gimbal base which holds the camera and where the battery sits during flight. The unit carries a Sony NEX-5N camera with a voigtlander 15mm lens. The X8 is capable of flying in winds over 40 km/h but for optimum images we prefer better conditions, however the ability to fly in such circumstances increases the number of viable flight days.
Flight planning is carried out on the ground control station which houses a computer, the radio transmitter, the radio, telemetry and video link antennae, two screens - one for the computer the other for the video feed and the power supplies for everything. The computer has a separate supply from the radio transmitter. 
The flight of the X8 is predefined to cover the area through parallel sweeps and consecutive, overlapping camera shots. The ground control station (GCS) is used to monitor the flight and allows an after flight image quality check. In case of an emergency, it provides the operator with the option to intervene and take what action is needed. The obtained data set consists of a number of pictures that are tagged with the GPS coordinates of the location where each picture was taken. The total number of pictures will depend on the size of the area covered and on the required resolution. The images are then processed using state-of-the-art software to generate ortho-photo mosaics or digital elevation models of the site.
The on site procedure for the use of the X8 consists of working through a Pre-flight Checklist to ensure the safe operation of the system. This outlines the checks that are to be made on the unit itself, the pre-planned route, the connection between the GCS and the X8, and a pilot and observer briefing before take off. The battery charges are all checked prior to flight. Launch and landing areas are inspected to ensure safety clearances are available. The camera is adjusted for the current light conditions. The project flight path is uploaded from the GCS to the X8. When all the way points have been uploaded the X8 is taken to the launch area.
A final “Safe Moment” is taken to ensure all is clear before launching. The X8 takes off under manual control and climbs to the height at which the operation will take place. This gives an opportunity to see if the unit is behaving correctly. Once the operational height is reached control of the unit is given over to the autopilot and the pre-planned route is followed. During the flight the X8 is monitored visually and with the GCS. At the end of the planned route the X8 will return to the home position and then manually landed. If at any point during the flight radio contact is lost then the X8 will automatically return home and land. After landing the flight log and images are downloaded and inspected to see that all is well.
Below are a number of images of the X8 in flight.

Pilbrow Surveying Limited PSL construction earthworks roading surveyors 0800 PSL NOWThe X8 was chosen from the many available UAV systems for a number of reasons.  It is manufactured by a New Zealand company, Altus. We did not want to have to deal with an overseas company for back up, maintenance and parts supply. The X8 has what is termed triple redundancy - it has twin GPS antennae, twin autopilots, four pairs of rotors and an ultimate fail safe in the form of a parachute system which deploys automatically if the unit tips over more than 70°. The system dismantles into two main sections - the power unit which comprises the rotors, electronic speed controllers, rotor arms, GPS antennae and autopilots and the gimbal base which holds the camera and where the battery sits during flight. The unit carries a Sony NEX-5N camera with a voigtlander 15mm lens. The X8 is capable of flying in winds over 40 km/h but for optimum images we prefer better conditions, however the ability to fly in such circumstances increases the number of viable flight days.
Flight planning is carried out on the ground control station which houses a computer, the radio transmitter, the radio, telemetry and video link antennae, two screens - one for the computer the other for the video feed and the power supplies for everything. The computer has a separate supply from the radio transmitter. 
The flight of the X8 is predefined to cover the area through parallel sweeps and consecutive, overlapping camera shots. The ground control station (GCS) is used to monitor the flight and allows an after flight image quality check. In case of an emergency, it provides the operator with the option to intervene and take what action is needed. The obtained data set consists of a number of pictures that are tagged with the GPS coordinates of the location where each picture was taken. The total number of pictures will depend on the size of the area covered and on the required resolution. The images are then processed using state-of-the-art software to generate ortho-photo mosaics or digital elevation models of the site.
The on site procedure for the use of the X8 consists of working through a Pre-flight Checklist to ensure the safe operation of the system. This outlines the checks that are to be made on the unit itself, the pre-planned route, the connection between the GCS and the X8, and a pilot and observer briefing before take off. The battery charges are all checked prior to flight. Launch and landing areas are inspected to ensure safety clearances are available. The camera is adjusted for the current light conditions. The project flight path is uploaded from the GCS to the X8. When all the way points have been uploaded the X8 is taken to the launch area.
A final “Safe Moment” is taken to ensure all is clear before launching. The X8 takes off under manual control and climbs to the height at which the operation will take place. This gives an opportunity to see if the unit is behaving correctly. Once the operational height is reached control of the unit is given over to the autopilot and the pre-planned route is followed. During the flight the X8 is monitored visually and with the GCS. At the end of the planned route the X8 will return to the home position and then manually landed. If at any point during the flight radio contact is lost then the X8 will automatically return home and land. After landing the flight log and images are downloaded and inspected to see that all is well.
Below are a number of images of the X8 in flight.

Pilbrow Surveying Limited PSL construction earthworks roading surveyors 0800 PSL NOWThe X8 was chosen from the many available UAV systems for a number of reasons.  It is manufactured by a New Zealand company, Altus. We did not want to have to deal with an overseas company for back up, maintenance and parts supply. The X8 has what is termed triple redundancy - it has twin GPS antennae, twin autopilots, four pairs of rotors and an ultimate fail safe in the form of a parachute system which deploys automatically if the unit tips over more than 70°. The system dismantles into two main sections - the power unit which comprises the rotors, electronic speed controllers, rotor arms, GPS antennae and autopilots and the gimbal base which holds the camera and where the battery sits during flight. The unit carries a Sony NEX-5N camera with a voigtlander 15mm lens. The X8 is capable of flying in winds over 40 km/h but for optimum images we prefer better conditions, however the ability to fly in such circumstances increases the number of viable flight days.
Flight planning is carried out on the ground control station which houses a computer, the radio transmitter, the radio, telemetry and video link antennae, two screens - one for the computer the other for the video feed and the power supplies for everything. The computer has a separate supply from the radio transmitter. 
The flight of the X8 is predefined to cover the area through parallel sweeps and consecutive, overlapping camera shots. The ground control station (GCS) is used to monitor the flight and allows an after flight image quality check. In case of an emergency, it provides the operator with the option to intervene and take what action is needed. The obtained data set consists of a number of pictures that are tagged with the GPS coordinates of the location where each picture was taken. The total number of pictures will depend on the size of the area covered and on the required resolution. The images are then processed using state-of-the-art software to generate ortho-photo mosaics or digital elevation models of the site.
The on site procedure for the use of the X8 consists of working through a Pre-flight Checklist to ensure the safe operation of the system. This outlines the checks that are to be made on the unit itself, the pre-planned route, the connection between the GCS and the X8, and a pilot and observer briefing before take off. The battery charges are all checked prior to flight. Launch and landing areas are inspected to ensure safety clearances are available. The camera is adjusted for the current light conditions. The project flight path is uploaded from the GCS to the X8. When all the way points have been uploaded the X8 is taken to the launch area.
A final “Safe Moment” is taken to ensure all is clear before launching. The X8 takes off under manual control and climbs to the height at which the operation will take place. This gives an opportunity to see if the unit is behaving correctly. Once the operational height is reached control of the unit is given over to the autopilot and the pre-planned route is followed. During the flight the X8 is monitored visually and with the GCS. At the end of the planned route the X8 will return to the home position and then manually landed. If at any point during the flight radio contact is lost then the X8 will automatically return home and land. After landing the flight log and images are downloaded and inspected to see that all is well.
Below are a number of images of the X8 in flight.
The X8 was chosen from the many available UAV systems for a number of reasons.  It is manufactured by a New Zealand company, Altus. We did not want to have to deal with an overseas company for back up, maintenance and parts supply. The X8 has what is termed triple redundancy - it has twin GPS antennae, twin autopilots, four pairs of rotors and an ultimate fail safe in the form of a parachute system which deploys automatically if the unit tips over more than 70°. The system dismantles into two main sections - the power unit which comprises the rotors, electronic speed controllers, rotor arms, GPS antennae and autopilots and the gimbal base which holds the camera and where the battery sits during flight. The unit carries a Sony NEX-5N camera with a voigtlander 15mm lens. The X8 is capable of flying in winds over 40 km/h but for optimum images we prefer better conditions, however the ability to fly in such circumstances increases the number of viable flight days.
Flight planning is carried out on the ground control station which houses a computer, the radio transmitter, the radio, telemetry and video link antennae, two screens - one for the computer the other for the video feed and the power supplies for everything. The computer has a separate supply from the radio transmitter. 
The flight of the X8 is predefined to cover the area through parallel sweeps and consecutive, overlapping camera shots. The ground control station (GCS) is used to monitor the flight and allows an after flight image quality check. In case of an emergency, it provides the operator with the option to intervene and take what action is needed. The obtained data set consists of a number of pictures that are tagged with the GPS coordinates of the location where each picture was taken. The total number of pictures will depend on the size of the area covered and on the required resolution. The images are then processed using state-of-the-art software to generate ortho-photo mosaics or digital elevation models of the site.
The on site procedure for the use of the X8 consists of working through a Pre-flight Checklist to ensure the safe operation of the system. This outlines the checks that are to be made on the unit itself, the pre-planned route, the connection between the GCS and the X8, and a pilot and observer briefing before take off. The battery charges are all checked prior to flight. Launch and landing areas are inspected to ensure safety clearances are available. The camera is adjusted for the current light conditions. The project flight path is uploaded from the GCS to the X8. When all the way points have been uploaded the X8 is taken to the launch area.
A final “Safe Moment” is taken to ensure all is clear before launching. The X8 takes off under manual control and climbs to the height at which the operation will take place. This gives an opportunity to see if the unit is behaving correctly. Once the operational height is reached control of the unit is given over to the autopilot and the pre-planned route is followed. During the flight the X8 is monitored visually and with the GCS. At the end of the planned route the X8 will return to the home position and then manually landed. If at any point during the flight radio contact is lost then the X8 will automatically return home and land. After landing the flight log and images are downloaded and inspected to see that all is well.
Below are a number of images of the X8 in flight.
Text Box:

54 Scott Rd, RD2, Te Kauwhata, 3782, New Zealand Phone: 07 8264337, Fax: 07 8264337, E-mail: PilbrowSurveying@xtra.co.nz

Text Box: Why Choose Pilbrow Surveying Limited?
Text Box: What we do
Text Box: What we have done 
Text Box: What others think
Text Box:  Who we are
Text Box: What gear do we use 
Pilbrow Surveying Limited construction earthworks surveyors logoText Box: Current news
Link to page outlining the Gatewing X100 aerial mapping system in use by Pilbrow Surveying Limited, the first company in New Zealand to be using the system.

0800 PSL NOW                PilbrowSurveying@xtra.co.nzWhy choose Pilbrow Surveying Limited?Text Box: FAQ’s
Detailed below is the operation of the X8 and the reasons why we are using this technology.
My thanks to Wayne Grant of AsureQuality for these photographs.

Need more information Call 0800 PSL NOW

Text Box: Current News Blog
The X8 unmanned aerial vehicle of Pilbrow Surveying Limited.Pilbrow Surveying Limited's X8 system in it's carrying caseThe Sony NEX-5N camera with voigtlander 15mmm lens mounted on the gimbal of Pilbrow Surveying Limited's X8 UAV.Screen shot of flight planning for Pilbrow Surveying Limited's X8 multirotor UAV system.The Ground Control Station for Pilbrow Surveying Limited's X8 multirotor UAV system.Pre-flight Checking of Pilbrow Surveying Limited's X8 multirotor UAV systemGround control station of Pilbrow Surveying Limited's X8 multirotor system during flightImage of Pilbrow Surveying Limited's X8 multirotor UAV in actionImage of Pilbrow Surveying Limited's X8 multirotor UAV in actionImage of Pilbrow Surveying Limited's X8 multirotor UAV in action